• August 2011

The Art of Enchantment

Is your business enchanting? If not, it may be time to launch an Enchantment Campaign, insists Apple’s former “chief evangelist,” Guy Kawasaki, our August Entrepreneur of the Month.

The author of Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions, tells us that enchantment is not about manipulating people. “Enchantment transforms situations and relationships,” Kawasaki explains. “It converts hostility into civility and civility into affinity. It changes skeptics and cynics into believers and the undecided into the loyal.”

Be it a simple retail transaction, high-level corporate negotiation, or Facebook update, be enchanting. “When it’s done right, it’s more powerful than traditional persuasion, influence, or marketing techniques. “Your goal is not merely to get what you want, but to bring about a voluntary, enduring, and delightful change in other people,” Kawasaki says.

Scroll down to read our interview with the man who Virgin Atlantic’s Sir Richard Branson says “captures the importance—and the art—of believing in an idea that delivers something entirely unique to the customer.” Then click on our Tips for Entrepreneurs for advice from Kawasaki on how you can start your enchantment campaign today.

Also in this issue: We feature 22 columns by and about entrepreneurs who have mastered the art of enchantment.

As Sir Thomas More said: “An enchanted world is one that speaks to the soul, to the mysterious depths of the heart and imagination where we find value, love, and union with the world around us.”

Here’s to your success! — Hope Katz Gibbs, publisher
Be Inkandescent Magazine / Inkandescent Public Relations

Guy Kawasaki On The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions

AUGUST 2011 ENTREPRENEUR OF THE MONTH: GUY KAWASAKI

Apple’s innovation guru has written his 10th book, which teaches the tactics needed to prepare and launch a campaign to enchant customers, employees—and bosses, too.

By Hope Katz Gibbs
Be Inkandescent Magazine

In addition to being one of the people who helped make Apple Computer into the mega success that it is today, entrepreneur and author Guy Kawasaki is the co-founder of Alltop.com, an online magazine rack of popular topics on the Web.

He is also the founding partner at Garage Technology Ventures, a seed-stage and early-stage venture capital fund that seeks to invest in extraordinary entrepreneurs who have the ability to build great teams and great companies.

His nine previous books include the bestselling title, The Art of the Start, as well as “Reality Check” and “The Macintosh Way.” A native of Hawaii, Kawasaki has a BA from Stanford University and an MBA from the University of California.

Why Enchantment?

We met Kawasaki last April at the “Empowered Women’s Success Summit” in Miami, where the author enchanted an audience of more than 300 female entrepreneurs.

Yes, he’s charming, intelligent, and well-spoken. In the last several years, he has become a go-to guy for business advice—especially in the social media sphere, where he has more than 300,000 followers on Twitter.

But it’s clear that Kawasaki’s real claim to fame is that he embodies his enchantment philosophy. When we interviewed him later, however, he surprised us by admitting that it’s not so easy to be enchanting 24 hours a day.

“I knew before I published the book that I was drawing a bull’s-eye on my back, and that if I was going to teach others to be enchanting, I’d better be a good role model.”

It seems Kawasaki is doing just that. One week after it hit book stores, “Enchantment” made three bestseller lists: New York Times (Advice, How-to, and Miscellaneous), The Wall Street Journal, (Hardcover Business) and Publishers Weekly (Hardcover Nonfiction).

When he agreed to be our August Entrepreneur of the Month, he confided that ours would be his 468th interview in the 90 days he had been on his book tour. Humbling, right? So we tried to ask Kawasaki some questions that the other 467 reporters didn’t.

Following is our Q&A with the Emperor of Enchantment from his home in California.

Be Inkandesent: What is so important about being enchanting?

Guy Kawasaki: For the past 25 years, I have been evangelizing about the power and importance of innovation, starting with my days as a diamond rep, followed by several years working to promote Macintosh computers. In the years since, I have started or helped fund more than a dozen companies, and one of the things I know for sure is that the more innovative the product, the more interesting it is, the more resistance there will be. Enchantment is the only solution. My goal is to teach people how to do it well.

Be Inkandesent: What enchants you?

Guy Kawasaki: The things that provide real solutions to my problems. I especially like things that do that with a degree of elegant design. I think that comes from my years working at Apple, as that belief was bred into me. At the moment I am enchanted by my Dymo LabelWriter 450 Turbo. It has a place for two rolls of labels, so you can print address labels on the left roll, and postage labels on right. Every time I use it, the thing brings a smile to my face.

Be Inkandesent: You explain in your book that Richard Branson of Virgin, and Tony Hsieh of Zappos are two entrepreneurs who run enchanting companies. To what do you attribute their savvy?

Guy Kawasaki: I don’t know why Branson and Hsieh get this concept so clearly, but they are great examples of innovators who have overcome the status quo. When I met Branson, for instance, he bent down to polish my shoes to illustrate his point that Virgin offers personal service. I was blown away, and ever since have been a loyal customer. I think it’s important to follow their lead—especially now, in a time of recession. No company can afford to throw money at a problem to solve it, and arguably, this is actually a better opportunity and time to grow a company. Leaders have to be clever and find creative ways to do new things. Personally, I think that makes for a more interesting world.

Be Inkandesent: You are no stranger to having to be resourceful. In fact, when Apple was just getting started, it was your job to get companies to build software for the fledgling computer company.

Guy Kawasaki: It was, and I certainly had to be enchanting, because no one knew what would happen with Apple. So it was very hard to get developers to spend their time and money to create a product for a new computer that may not be around in three years. It really was all about smoke and mirrors, but ignorance is bliss. It’s also empowering. Don’t know that I’d even try it now, but it sure was fun at the time.

Be Inkandesent: Do you think most small business owners understand how to be enchanting?

Guy Kawasaki: I do. One of the biggest jobs for a successful entrepreneur is to get people to believe in their big idea. Of course, we entrepreneurs are also slightly delusional, and it does take a little training to get it right. The real struggle, I think, is that so many professionals focus only on building a better widget. But perfecting the product or service is only the beginning. Getting people to go along for the ride, to want to invest financially and emotionally, well, that’s the hard part.

Be Inkandesent: The book does a beautiful job of teaching readers how to be more enchanting. Do you find that taking your advice is easy or challenging?

Guy Kawasaki: First and foremost, my goal is to be consistent. I knew that if I was going to write a book like this, I was drawing a target on my back. But don’t cry for me. I knew what I was getting myself into. For others, the payoff may not be as clear, because it’s hard to be totally consistent all the time. But I will make the case that it’s easier to be enchanting than it is to be a jerk.

Be Inkandesent: You grew up in Hawaii, and you’ve said publicly that your parents had a big influence on shaping your ability to enchant others.

Guy Kawasaki: I grew up Japanese-American in Hawaii, and my parents did a great job teaching me about the beauty of living in a melting pot. We were a minority, but we were far from oppressed. My father was a politician most of his life—a state senator—and although I never want to be a politician, as the pay is lousy and the work is hard, watching him work provided lessons in how to be enchanting. My mom was a huge influence, too. She taught me not to take any crap off of anyone.

Be Inkandesent: After getting your MBA at UCLA, and before working at Apple, you worked in the diamond business. What did you learn there?

Guy Kawasaki: That is actually where I learned some of my first lessons in the art of enchantment. The diamond industry is very competitive, so you have to prove why your designs are better than the next company’s. Finding success also comes from building trust. After all, you can’t take apart a ring to see if it’s really 18K, and once trust is lost, you are done. It’s one of the pillars of enchantment.

Be Inkandesent: You have written nine other books on entrepreneurship and innovation. What were some of your favorites?

Guy Kawasaki: I really liked “Hindsights,” which was a book of interviews with others on their insights into their business successes and failures. That was fascinating to research.

Be Inkandesent: What will your next book be about?

Guy Kawasaki: Ha. I actually don’t know if I have an 11th book in me. The only reason to write a book is to have something to say, so I’m going to have to find that or there will be no point. I’ll keep you posted.

Be Inkandesent: What is your favorite part of your job?

Guy Kawasaki: I really like being a public speaker and official enchanter. But what I like even more is being at home. I travel so much, so my idea of a vacation is not getting on a plane.

Be Inkandesent: We interviewed the origami artist who created the Kawasaki Butterfly for the cover of your book. Tell us about the crowd-sourcing experiment that led to that idea. Would you take the same approach again?

Guy Kawasaki: Oh, yes. From my perspective, exploitative as it may seem, I got 250 smart people to give me a design for the cover. My team and I loved this great butterfly that was based on a stock photo and was designed by a young foreign student. But the editors didn’t think it would work well, so we substituted the origami art for the stock image. I would do it again the same way, because it democratized the design process. I consider that to be a moral victory for crowd-sourcing. After all, I make lots of free speeches, which I consider to be my moral obligation to society. It’s also an investment, because you never know who may be in the audience who will hire me for my speaking fee at a later date. Crowd-sourcing is the best sign of our new, flat economy.

Be Inkandescent: Can you give us a little perspective on the future of the economy. Are you worried?

Guy Kawasaki: I have seen many cycles of highs and lows, and I decided long ago not to depend on some Commerce Department statistic to determine what I will and won’t do as an entrepreneur. I focus on the big picture, and am more concerned about making a sale. If I can, I’m still in business.

Click here to start your Enchantment Campaign!

Guy Kawasaki's Journey to Enchantment

“This book is for people who see life for what it can be rather than what it can’t,” writes Guy Kawasaki in the introduction to his 2011 title, “Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions.”

“They are bringing to market a cause—that is, a product, service, organization, or idea—that can make the world a better place,” he explains. “They realize that in a world of mass media, social media, and advertising media, it takes more than instant, shallow, and temporary relationships to get the job done.”

Kawasaki says, only slightly joking, that 90 percent of the battle of being enchanting is showing up, and the other 90 percent is persevering after you show up.

Here are his four rules for being enchanting:

1. You have to be able to explain what you do in the first 30 seconds of meeting someone.

2. When delivering a PowerPoint presentation, think 10-20-30: 10 slides, 20 minutes, and use letters that are a point-size of 30.

3. The most important thing to do when starting a company is to stop planning and thinking—just build a prototype.

4. Always hire people better than you in areas where you are not strong. If you have two marketing guys rubbing sticks together, the company is not going to fly.

Launching an Enchantment Campaign

When it comes to embarking on your enchantment journey, Kawasaki provides the following itinerary:

Chapter 1: Why Enchantment?

The greater your goals, the more you’ll need to change people’s hearts, minds, and actions. This is especially true if you have few resources and big competitors. If you need to enchant people, you’re doing something meaningful. If you are doing something meaningful, you need enchantment.

Chapter 2: How to Achieve Likeability

Has someone you disliked ever enchanted you? I doubt it. If he or she did, I doubt the feeling lasted long. This is why the first step of enchantment is to get people to like you. To accomplish this, you’ll need to accept others and find something to like in them.

Chapter 3: How to Achieve Trustworthiness

Has anyone you distrusted ever enchanted you? I doubt this, too. Achieving trustworthiness is the second step. People trust you when you are knowledgeable, competent, make bigger pies, and create win-win situations—in short, when you do the right things the right way.

Chapter 4: How to Prepare

Great products, services, organizations, and ideas are enchanting. Crap is not. Preparing to enchant people requires creating something great, communicating it in short, simple, and swallowable terms, and working your butt off to get it to market before your competition.

Chapter 5: How to Launch

Great enchanters ship. This is what Richard Branson and Steve Jobs do better than anyone else. Ever. Launching your cause involves immersing people in your cause, getting them at least to try it, and recruiting your first followers to help you spread the word.

Chapter 6: How to Overcome Resistance

People often accept “good enough” products and services because they are busy or don’t know better. You will encounter resistance to change in these situations. The way to overcome resistance is to produce social proof, find a way to agree, and enchant all the influencers.

Chapter 7: How to Make Enchantment Endure

Enchantment is a process, not an event. You want your efforts to endure, and this requires that people internalize your cause, reciprocate, and fulfill their commitments. It also helps to build an ecosystem of resellers, consultants, developers, and user groups around your cause.

Chapter 8: How to Use Push Technology

Have you wondered how to use PowerPoint, Twitter, and email to push your information? These products can enable you to bring your story to the people you want to enchant. This chapter explains how to do this using the latest technology.

Chapter 9: How to Use Pull Technology

In addition to push technology, there’s pull technology. In this case, you bring people to your story instead of bringing your story to people. This chapter focuses on using websites, blogs, Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube to enchant people and encourage them to come to you.

Chapter 10: How to Enchant Your Employees

Enchantment is not only an outbound activity, but one that you should direct at your employees, too. If you provide them with the opportunity to master skills, the autonomy to work independently, and the chance to realize a positive purpose, you can enchant employees.

Chapter 11: How to Enchant Your Boss

Imagine working for someone you’ve enchanted. The benefits include freedom, flexibility, money, and mentoring. Enchanting your boss requires re-prioritizing your efforts to make her or him successful—but the outcome is worth it.

Chapter 12: How to Resist Enchantment

Not every enchanting person has your best interests at heart. Resisting enchantment, therefore, is a valuable skill that requires avoiding tempting situations, looking far into the future, and finding a devil’s advocate. After reading this chapter, you may even be able to resist Apple’s products.

Get started! Click here to buy Kawasaki’s Enchantment.

A discovery is said to be an accident meeting a prepared mind.”

– Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

We are all of us born with a letter inside us, and that only if we are true to ourselves, may we be allowed to read it before we die.”

– Douglas Coupland

You must learn to be still in the midst of activity 
and to be vibrantly alive in repose.”

– Indira Ghandi

We need to learn to set our course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

– General Omar Bradley

Always look at what you have left. Never look at what you have lost.”

– Robert H. Schuller

Acknowledging the good that you already have in your life is the foundation for all abundance.”

– Eckhart Tolle

There’s nowhere you can be that isn’t where you’re meant to be…”

– John Lennon

If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. 
Now put foundations under them.”

– Henry David Thoreau

Once you find something you love to do, be the best at doing it.”

– Debbi Fields, Mrs. Fields Cookies

A man without a smiling face
 should not open a shop.”

– Chinese Proverb

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.”

– William Butler Yeats

Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.”

– Seneca

The fixity of a habit is generally in direct proportion to its absurdity.”

– Marcel Proust

Speaking more than one language is no longer just an asset in today’s job market; it is a requirement.”

– Tom Adams, CEO, Rosetta Stone

Why am I whispering when I have something to say?”

– Eve Ensler

Success is the necessary misfortune of life, but it is only to the very unfortunate that it comes early.”

– Anthony Trollope

If your success is not on your own terms, if it looks good to the world but does not feel good in your heart, it is not success at all.”

– Anna Quindlen

There is only one success – to be able to spend your life in your own way.”

– Christopher Morley

Never cut what you can untie.”

– Joseph Joubert

‎That which grows fast withers as rapidly; that which grows slowly endures.”

– J.G. Holland, novelist

Let us seize the day and the opportunity and strive for that greatness of spirit that measures life not by its disappointments but by its possibilities.”

– W.E.B. Du Bois

Nothing is a mistake. There’s no win and no fail. There’s only make.”

– Corita Kent

Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.”

– Thomas Edison

Try not to become a man of success but rather to become a man of value.”

– Albert Einstein

It is possible to fail in many ways…while to succeed is possible only in one way.”

– Aristotle

If we all did the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astound ourselves.”

– Thomas Edison

If you want to be busy, keep trying to be perfect. If you want to be happy, focus on making a difference.”

– Lisa Earle McLeod

You’ve got to be willing to crash and burn. If you’re afraid of failing, you won’t get very far.”

– Steve Jobs

The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.”

– Carl Rogers

If people like you they’ll listen to you; if they trust you, they’ll do business with you.”

– Zig Ziglar

The biggest flaw in our existing theory of capitalism lies in its misrepresentation of human nature.”

– Muhammad Yunus

Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow know what you truly want to become.”

– Steve Jobs

Success is about finding a livelihood that brings joy, self-sufficiency, and a sense of contributing.”

– Anita Roddick

An entrepreneur tends to bite off a little more than he can chew hoping he’ll quickly learn how to chew it.“


– Roy Ash, co-founder of Litton Industries

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”

– Leonardo da Vinci

Education is an admirable thing to have, but it is well to remember that nothing worth knowing can be taught.”

– Oscar Wilde

If you wish success in life, make perseverance your bosom friend, experience your wise counselor, caution your elder brother, and hope your guardian genius.”

– Joseph Addison

Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value.”

– Albert Einstein

As your desire is, so is your will. As your will is, so is your deed. As your deed is, so is your destiny.”

– Brihadaranyaka Upanishad

In three words I can sum up everything I’ve learned about life: it goes on.

– Robert Frost

Sometimes the dreams that come true are the dreams you never even knew you had.”

– Alice Sebold, The Lovely Bones

Persist and persevere, and you will find most things that are attainable, possible.”

– Lord Chesterfield

The true entrepreneur is a doer, not a dreamer.”

– Nolan Bushnell, founder, Chuck E. Cheese's

I find out what the world needs, then I proceed to invent.”

– Thomas Edison

The goal of Life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe, to match your nature with nature.”

– Joseph Cambell

Hope sees the invisible, feels the intangible, and achieves the impossible.”

– Helen Keller

The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new lands, but in seeing with new eyes.”

– Marcel Proust

Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self-confidence.”

– Robert Frost

Don’t wait for someone else to lead you to your right life; that privilege—and responsibility—is yours alone.”

– Martha Beck

Nobody talks about entrepreneurship as survival, but that’s exactly what nurtures creative thinking.”

– Anita Roddick, founder, The Body Shop

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