• January 2016

Ring in 2016 by Partying Like a Rock Star — With Celebrity Rocker Michael Franti

We start off the year by celebrating six full years of publishing Be Inkandescent magazine. And, we couldn’t think of a better gift to give our readers than shining the Inkandescent spotlight on the fabulous, uber-positive rock star Michael Franti.

“From his hits, “The Sound of Sunshine,” and “Life Is Better With You,” Franti not only entertains audiences around the world — he spreads a potent message of peace, love, and acceptance. It was an honor to interview him. Click here to listen to our podcast interview. And scroll down to read our Q&A.

Also in this issue: We bring you 16 articles to help you ramp up your positivity quotient as you begin 2016.

  • Best-selling author Dan Pink shows us what it really means to harness our “Drive” in this month’s Book of the Month.
  • Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association gives us insight into the battles fought and won by the suffragist movement, which gave women the right to vote in 1920. Learn more in this month’s History column.
  • Talk about success! Read this month’s Truly Amazing Women article to find out how one of the magazine’s past Entrepreneurs of the Month, USPS leader Shoshana Grove, just landed a new CEO job.
  • For more celebrity insights, you’ll find words of leadership wisdom from one of the founders of The Byrds, Roger McGuinn.

We hope this parting lyric from Michael Franti leaves you inspired as you embark on the new year: “Don’t let mistakes be so monumental, don’t let your love be so confidential, don’t let your mind be so darn judgmental, and please let your heart be more influential. Be thankful for all that the Spirit provides, and be thankful for all that you see without eyes.”

Happy New Year! — Hope Gibbs, publisher, Be Inkandescent

Michael Franti Teaches Us the Meaning of Success

THE MAGIC OF MUSIC: JANUARY 2016

By Hope Katz Gibbs, Publisher, Be Inkandescent Magazine

In his best-selling album, “All People,” American poet, musician, and composer Michael Franti and his band, Spearhead, spread their message of love, peace, and social justice.

The band blends hip-hop with a variety of other styles — including funk, reggae, jazz, folk, and rock — and it serves as a forum for Franti’s outspoken support for a spectrum of peace and social justice issues.

Franti also founded a nonprofit organization, Do It For The Love Foundation, a wish-granting organization that brings people who are in advanced stages of life threatening illnesses, children with severe challenges, and wounded veterans to live concerts.

Scroll down for our Q&A. And click here to listen to our podcast interview on the Inkandescent Radio Network.

Be Inkandescent: Let’s start off talking about your Do It For The Love Foundation. What inspired you and co-founder Sara Agah to create this nonprofit?

Michael Franti: My better half, Sara, is an emergency room nurse, and for the last few years we have been trying to figure out a way to combine what she does in healthcare with my music. Our Do It For The Love Foundation brings people to live concerts who are in an advanced stage of a life-threatening illness, as well as kids with severe challenges and veterans.

The best part of my work with the Foundation is meeting people — such as a young woman who has lymphoma. Although she was an honors student, her disease worsened to the point where she had to stop going to school. A friend of hers got in touch with us and they all flew down to our show as a surprise to her.

When I sat and talked with her, she told me she has lived with pain her whole life, and it is just getting worse and worse. She says she doesn’t have much time to live, but that she is worried about the world, and that if she could take away everyone’s pain even just for 15 minutes, she would take it on herself. I was so moved by hearing this 20-year-old woman say that, and by meeting her younger brother and his friend, who were both 17 and who had pulled off this whole plan to get her here through our Foundation.

Be Inkandescent: That’s a big theme for you, too, the idea of taking on the world’s problems as your own and trying to come up with solutions. What inspired you to have that as your mission?

Michael Franti: When I was a born, my birth mother carried me for nine months and then she held me for one hour and gave me up for adoption to the Franti family. They are second-generation Finnish-Americans who had three kids of their own.

My mother was a public school teacher in California for 30 years, and she was very much a leader in our house. She insisted that even though we were all very different — different heights, different colors, different views on the world — she would treat all of us the same, and we would all have the same opportunities to succeed.

I learned that ethic from her, and I believe it’s the same for the whole world. We all should share the same rights and should be given the same opportunities to succeed.

Be Inkandescent: Tell us more about the work you do traveling around the world to promote your message of love and social justice.

Michael Franti: I’ve played in prisons, schools, on the street, and I’ve found that it doesn’t matter where you play, it doesn’t matter what economic sphere people are in or what their education, culture, language, or religion is … people are the same when the music starts.

You look in their eyes and see smiles, people start to dance, they start to move, eventually people laugh, they cry, they hug their friends. Music really is a universal language. One of my favorite things to do is to travel and play with people of other cultures and other musical experiences that I didn’t know about.

Be Inkandescent: Did you ever think when you were a little kid that you would be doing this?

Michael Franti: It really was not an ambition of mine. Throughout my childhood, all I wanted to do was be a basketball player, and I eventually played basketball at the University of San Francisco. My dorm room was right above the campus radio station, so I’d hear these bass lines coming up through the floor all of the time, and at first it was kind of annoying. Then I started getting the thrill of music, hearing all of these different styles of music coming out of the campus radio station — hip-hop, punk rock, jazz. At 6 a.m. they would play Chinese music only. It was a great musical education.

So I bought a bass and copied what I heard coming up through the floor. Then I started writing lyrics, poems really, and performing these poems with other artists. The mixture of the melody and the chords and the portability of being able to go out onto the street or beach, wherever, and just sit there and play — that’s what I love about it.

Click here to read the rest of our interview!

And don’t miss our Entrepreneurial Tip of the Month: Does Breaking Bread Help Make a Negotiation a Success? Professor Margaret Neale of the Stanford Graduate School of Business explains. Click here to read all about it.

Does Breaking Bread Help Make a Negotiation a Success?

Deals over lunch may be tasty, but here’s why they’re not always smart.

By Elizabeth MacBride
Reporter
Stanford Graduate School of Business

People negotiating a deal commonly have a meal or two together. Sharing a meal seems a gesture of goodwill — after all, who’s going to fight in one sentence and then say, pass the sushi in the next? You might suppose, then, that negotiating while eating can only help bring good deals to fruition.

Not so fast. While such thinking propels the lunchtime scenes everywhere from the Four Seasons in New York City to Chateau Marmont in Los Angeles, new research from Stanford Graduate School of Business calls it into question.

Professor Margaret Neale and doctoral student Peter Belmi find that sharing food does help create more valuable deals in competitive negotiations. But in situations that are cooperative, such as when the two parties are friends, meal sharing reduces the overall value of the deal.

What are the two or three lessons a negotiator could draw from this research?

Neale: Food sharing would be one of my tools in my tool kit. Having a meal where you share food would be a good strategy in a competitive situation where there is an adversarial relationship. If you’re going to a lawyer’s office, and it’s you negotiating with your soon-to-be ex-spouse, you might want to suggest a plate of cookies on the table. If you are negotiating to end a dispute with another company, plan a meal at a restaurant.

Belmi: On the other hand, if you have a cooperative negotiation, food sharing may facilitate a quick resolution but not necessarily a good resolution. So it might not be a good idea in a cooperative negotiation.

How do you tell the difference between the two?

Belmi: In more competitive negotiations, people want to have the best possible deal for themselves, and typically, they see their counterpart as having adversarial or opposing motives. In cooperative negotiations, typically people are more concerned about reaching an agreement for all parties involved.

Neale: In a competitive situation, you have that assessment that this is going to be really tough. We are really at odds. In the laboratory we can tell folks: This is a very contentious negotiation.

How did you do the research?

Belmi: We told participants they were negotiating in either a competitive or a cooperative situation, and then we asked them to negotiate while they ate food that was either shared or individually served during the interaction. At the end of the exercise, we measured their perception of the interaction and assessed value creation by examining the joint gain created by the two parties. We used apples and caramel sauce in one study, and then we used chips and salsa in another study. What we found is that when people were negotiating in a competitive situation, sharing the food — and by that we mean sharing, not just eating — they created significantly more value. On the other hand, people negotiating in a cooperative situation created less value.

What’s your explanation for what’s going on?

Neale: When you have a competitive negotiation, the added presence of food makes folks uncertain about how to behave. It’s that juxtaposition of that social ritual, which is cooperative, and the negotiation, which is competitive. That disconnect gets people to pay more attention to each other. They realize opportunities to create value that they wouldn’t otherwise.

What happens in the cooperative negotiation? Is everyone just more relaxed and not focused on the deal at hand?

Belmi: In a cooperative negotiation, sharing food creates a comfortable and familiar environment, and people can become more concerned about maintaining that atmosphere rather than finding the best deal. So, food sharing in that situation could restrict important information exchange and distract negotiators from finding the best outcomes. You’re also probably concerned about maintaining the relationship. The deal may be less important.

Does it matter what people eat?

Neale: It is the shared-ness of the food that’s important. In one of the studies, some participants were given their own plates of chips and salsa, and some were given a communal bowl. Those who ate from a communal bowl and were in a competitive negotiation created more value, and those who were in a cooperative situation created less value. It was the communal bowl that made the difference, not eating.

The suggestion might be: If you’re in a competitive negotiation, take someone to an Ethiopian restaurant!

Or, order appetizers. Did this research address the effect of sharing food in cultures outside California?

Neale: We did not look at different cultures specifically; however, the ritual of sharing food among humans is typically a cooperative one — and not just in California or the United States. So, the specific answer to your question is no; however, we would not be surprised if sharing food has a similar effect on negotiators from other countries and other cultures.

Is there more research to be done?

Neale: One area to consider is what happens when people bring the food instead of being given it. Does that affect the status of the giver and the receiver?

Isn’t it possible that sharing anything — not just food — would create the same effect?

Belmi: It’s not the effect of sharing in general. We had study participants share a calculator and didn’t see a similar difference in how our participants approached the negotiation.

What’s different about food, then? The biology? The ritual surrounding it?

Neale: Food sharing is cooperative and communal in a way that sharing a calculator is not. Sharing a calculator is slightly cooperative, but it doesn’t have the same kind of social overlay. With whom do we share food? Our families, people in our social circle. It’s the inconsistency between the competitive negotiation and the cooperative nature of sharing food that makes the difference. The lesson here is that you’re really trying to generate a sense of uncertainty. That helps you pay closer attention to your counterpart, and that, in turn, allows you to find ways to create more value.


Margaret Neale is Adams Distinguished Professor of Management. Peter Belmi, who was a doctoral student in organizational behavior at Stanford Graduate School of Business when this article first appeared, is now an assistant professor of leadership and organizational behavior at the Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia. This piece was originally published by Stanford Graduate School of Business.

There is a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in.”

– Leonard Cohen

I can’t go back to yesterday—because I was a different person then.”

– Lewis Carroll

The goal of Life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe, to match your nature with nature.”

– Joseph Cambell

Inspiration and genius — one and the same.”

– Victor Hugo

Let yourself be silently drawn by the strange pull of what you really love.”

– Jalaluddin Rumi

Success is the necessary misfortune of life, but it is only to the very unfortunate that it comes early.”

– Anthony Trollope

If people like you they’ll listen to you; if they trust you, they’ll do business with you.”

– Zig Ziglar

The fixity of a habit is generally in direct proportion to its absurdity.”

– Marcel Proust

The aim of life is to live, and to live means to be aware, joyously, drunkenly, serenely, divinely aware.”

– Henry Miller

If you do work that you love, and the work fulfills you, the rest will come.”

– Oprah Winfrey

Most people never pick up the phone and call. Most people never ask, and that’s what separates the people who do things from the people who just dream about them.”

– Steve Jobs

A great secret of success is to go through life as a man who never gets used up.”

– Albert Schweitzer

Change is a math formula. Change happens when the cost of the status quo is greater than the risk of change.”

– Alan Webber, author, "Rules of Thumb"

The less effort, the faster and more powerful you will be.”

– Bruce Lee

Many people prefer to play it safe when it comes to business matters. Are you willing to take risks in the pursuit of entrepreneurial success?”

– Steven Schussler

Happiness is an attitude. We either make ourselves miserable, or happy and strong. The amount of work is the same.”

– Francesca Reigle

We are not meant to resolve all contradictions, but to live with them and rise above them.”

– William Blake

If it really was a no-brainer to make it on your own in business there’d be millions of no-brained, harebrained individuals quitting their day jobs.”

– Bill Rancic, "The Apprentice"

Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are. 
Let me not pass you by in quest of some rare and perfect tomorrow.”

– Mary Jean Irion

They who give have all things. They who withhold have nothing.”

– Hindu Proverb

The journey is the reward.”

– Greg Norman

A discovery is said to be an accident meeting a prepared mind.”

– Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

Instead of loving your enemies, treat your friends a little better.”

– Edgar W. Howe

Find somebody to be successful for. Raise their hopes. Think of their needs.”

– Barack Obama

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do.”

– Mark Twain

The gem cannot be polished without friction; nor man perfected without trials.”

– Chinese proverb

Don’t wait for someone else to lead you to your right life; that privilege—and responsibility—is yours alone.”

– Martha Beck

A person who learns to juggle six balls will be more skilled than the person who never tries to juggle more than three.”

– Marilyn vos Savant

A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and goes to bed at night and in between does what he wants to do.”

– Bob Dylan

If you wish success in life, make perseverance your bosom friend, experience your wise counselor, caution your elder brother, and hope your guardian genius.”

– Joseph Addison

Don’t follow, lead. Don’t copy, create. Don’t start, finish. Don’t sit still, move. Don’t fit in, stand out. Don’t sit quietly, speak up. (Not all the time, sure, but more often.)”

– Seth Godin

Do you have the desire to create something new; the strength of conviction to believe your creation will be successful, and the reservoir of energy necessary to thrust it into the marketplace?”

– Steven Schussler

The critical ingredient is getting off your butt and doing something.”

– Nolan Bushnell, founder, Chuck E. Cheese's

The person who makes a success of living is the one who see his goal steadily and aims for it unswervingly. That is dedication.”

– Cecil B. DeMille

Permanence, perseverance and persistence in spite of all obstacles distinguishes the strong soul from the weak.”

– Thomas Carlyle

Do not be afraid of mistakes, providing you do not make the same one twice.”

– Eleanor Roosevelt

Whosoever knows how to fight well is not angry. Whosoever knows how to conquer enemies does not fight them.”

– Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken-winged bird that cannot fly. Hold fast to dreams, for when dreams go, life is a barren field frozen with snow.”

– Langston Hughes

Friendship is the only cement that will hold the world together.”

– Woodrow Wilson

It is to no purpose to turn away from the real nature of the affair because the honor of its elements excites repugnance.

– Carl von Clausewitz, On War

The awakening to the mystery of life is a revolutionary event; in it an old world is destroyed so that a new and better one may take its place.”

– J.J. Van Der Leeuw, The Conquest of Illusion

Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”

– Nelson Mandela

This is the age when magical technologies make more and more radically fun ideas plausible, even easy. You’re only limited by your creativity.”

– Martha Beck

Destiny is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved.”

– William Jennings Bryan

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”

– Leonardo da Vinci

Hope sees the invisible, feels the intangible, and achieves the impossible.”

– Helen Keller

The world I believed in, back in my most innocent, uninformed, childish mind—is real.”

– Martha Beck

If you want to be busy, keep trying to be perfect. If you want to be happy, focus on making a difference.”

– Lisa Earle McLeod

There is little success where there is little laughter.”

– Andrew Carnegie

The true entrepreneur is a doer, not a dreamer.”

– Nolan Bushnell, founder, Chuck E. Cheese's

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