• August 2012

The Power of Unreasonable People

Playwright George Bernard Shaw once said: “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself.
Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man.”

“By this definition, some of today’s leading entrepreneurs are decidedly unreasonable—and a fair few have even been dubbed crazy,” insists Pamela Hartigan, our August Entrepreneur of the Month (pictured above).

The director of the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at Oxford University’s Saïd Business School. honored us with an interview earlier this summer when she was in NYC on her way to a conference in Brazil. Scroll down for our Q&A to learn more the new generation of entrepreneurs whose are changing the world.

Also in This Issue:

  • Rippling, by Beverly Schwartz, teaches us how social entrepreneurs are spreading innovation throughout the world. Click here for the review.
  • Ashoka founder Bill Drayton, chairman of the international social entrepreneurial organization, believes everyone can be a changemaker. Are you ready?
  • Two Truly Amazing Women inspire us this month: Tara Palacios, director of the BizLaunch program at Arlington Economic Development; and Annette Giacomazzi, whose daughter broke a bone—for the sixth time—prompting her to launch the cool California company, CastCoverZ!.

We leave you with this parting thought from the immortal Viktor Frankl, author of Man’s Search for Meaning: “Everyone has his own specific vocation or mission in life to carry out a concrete assignment which demands fulfillment. Therein he cannot be replaced, nor can his life be repeated. Thus, everyone’s task is as unique as is his specific opportunity to implement it.”

Here’s to your unique and important success. — Hope Gibbs
publisher, Be Inkandescent • president, InkandescentPR • founder, InkandescentNetworking.new! InkandescentSpeakers.com
Photo of Hartigan, above, courtesy of DumboFeather.com

Oxford's Pamela Hartigan on the Future of Social Entrepreneurship

AUGUST 2012:

OXFORD’S PAMELA HARTIGAN TEACHES US
HOW TO CHANGE THE WORLD

By Hope Gibbs
Be Inkandescent

Entrepreneurial phenom Pamela Hartigan has been the director of the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship since January 2009. She has worked with many well-known members of the social entrepreneurial community—including micro-finance guru Muhammad Yunus (pictured above with Hartigan).

Of course, Hartigan is no stranger to running high-profile organizations. In 2008, she helped launch Volans Ventures, an organization focused on building innovative scalable solutions to challenges affecting our future.

Prior to that, she spent eight years as the first managing director of the Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship, (2000-2008), a sister organization of the World Economic Forum, where she was also on the Forum Managing Board. It is focused on advancing the practice of social entrepreneurship globally, building and supporting its community of practitioners whose efforts have achieved transformational social change.

In fact, the foreword of her book, “The Power of Unreasonable People,” is by World Economic Forum chairman Klaus Schwab.

He gives us perspective on the history of social entrepreneurship, and how far the idea has come in the last four decades, explaining:

“No one did more to open our eyes to the the potential [of social entrepreneurship] than Muhammad Yunus. In the early 1970s, he began his tireless work to prove that poor women are creditworthy. How many more ‘unreasonable’ people like Yunus are out there? Hundreds, perhaps thousands.”

Knowing the potential of social entrepreneurship, supporting those who understand the concept, and promoting them, has been Hartigan’s lifelong mission.

Throughout her career, she has held varied leadership positions in multilateral health organizations and educational institutions, as well as in entrepreneurial nonprofits. A graduate of Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service in Washington, DC, she also holds masters’ degrees in Economics and Public Health and a PhD in Cognitive Psychology. Her book was co-written by John Elkington, director of the international consulting firm SustainAbility, and published by Harvard Business Review Press.

Earlier this summer, we had the privilege of interviewing Dr. Hartigan when she stopped in at Oxford’s New York City office, before heading off to Brazil to speak at conference there.

Be Inkandescent: You are a frequent lecturer on social entrepreneurship and innovation at graduate schools of business in the USA, Europe, and Asia, and an adjunct professor at the Columbia Business School. Can you explain to us exactly what is social entrepreneurism?

Pamela Hartigan: Social entrepreneurship is a new word for something that has been around since people first came together in communities. It really is about applying innovation, creativity, and resourcefulness to create new approaches, new ways of doing things, and it seeks improved ways to do things that aren’t functional or aren’t working. It its essence, it is a mindset about how you approach an opportunity.

Be Inkandescent: You have been quoted as saying that entrepreneurs are an interesting breed, for they tend to see opportunities where the rest of us see major risks, and they go after those opportunities because they understand that there is a possibility of completely creating something new.

Pamela Hartigan: Indeed. And I find it a fascinating mindset, for most of us do not have that. Most people run away from things that we think are impossible. But entrepreneurs are drawn to it like a moth to a flame.

Be Inkandescent: So you don’t believe there are many real entrepreneurs in the world?

Pamela Hartigan: No. But there are an awful lot of entrepreneurial wannabes, and that is one of the reasons we have this buzzword now—everyone wants to be an “entrepreneur.” But true social entrepreneurs are people who have a vision for combining purpose with sustainability. The important thing to recognize is that we all have the capacity to contribute to the kind of world we want to see.

This is new, because for the longest time entrepreneurs have tried to be successful in a world fragmented by an either-or choice: making money versus doing good. This has gotten us to a completely dysfunctional situation. Going forward, I believe that many of us will be part of a growing ecosystem that supports entrepreneurs—either from the financing perspective, legal perspective, or any type of other industry that the financial world has at its disposal. What’s important is that we need to be able to find financial sustainability for these big ideas.

Be Inkandescent: What are some of these new businesses that you see emerging?

Pamela Hartigan: There are so many! For example, in the area of technology, there are new tools being released that provide e-banking for the poor. And Jane Chen, who co-founded a company called Embrace, used her business and engineering savvy to come up with an innovative, low-tech baby warmer. Her product is saving millions of premature babies around the world who would not otherwise have access to incubators.

These aren’t charities, or short-term solutions to problems that will continue forever. These are solutions that are forever changing ancient systems and eradicating age-old problems.

That is what is really exciting about disruptive companies, because they are creating massive improvements—and not just because there are financial rewards waiting for them when they do. These social entrepreneurs are creating new models for survival and success in markets that no one else is looking at. It’s wonderful.

Don’t stop now! Click here to learn more from Pamela Hartigan.

How to Become a Social Entrepreneur

What does it take to become a company that is more focused on societal change than financial reward?

That is but one of the questions we asked Pamela Hartigan, the director of Oxford’s Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship, which is named for eBay billionaire Jeff Skoll—one of the world’s best known “philanthroactivists.”

Married to an Australian for 40 years, Hartigan was recently featured in an article published in Australia’s Dumbo Feather.com that describes her as talking with rage and energy.

“She also talks no bullshit,” insists reporter Patrick Pittman, adding that Hartigan has “spent a career working to disrupt and change systems from within and from without. She builds bridges.”

We had the privilege of interviewing this petite powerhouse in New York City earlier this summer, and found that Pittman’s observations were spot-on. Scroll down to see for yourself.

Be Inkandescent: You been quoted as saying that the new term “social entrepreneurialism” doesn’t exactly explain the true nature of this growing phenomenon. How would you redefine it?

Pamela Hartigan: I think of this business model as “sustainable entrepreneurship,” because it has to be socially sustainable, financially sustainable, and environmentally sustainable. For years, “social entrepreneur” has served as a useful term, but I think that people confuse it with charity—and it is not about charity. It is about really rebooting the entire system in an entrepreneurial way so that we really are responding to what we call wicked problems—intractable problems that we are having a terrible time trying to solve.

It is really interesting, but sometimes I think we live in the “age of stupid,” where solutions are so obvious. People don’t know the simple things and they want to over-complicate things. Many of the entrepreneurs I work with aren’t held back by this thinking. They find a very simple solution to a complex problem that has eluded so many for so long; and then people see what they are doing and say, “but that’s so easy.”

Be Inkandescent: In your book, you write about Andrea and Barry Coleman, founders of Riders For Health as a good example of this phenomenon.

Pamela Hartigan: Yes, they are the perfect example, because these two motorcycle fanatics went to Africa to race motorcycles, and found that all the vehicles used by the ministries and big NGOs delivering health services were nonfunctional. They realized that it was simply because no one knew how to repair these vehicles, and there were no parts available to repair them.

They saw that the solution was to create a transportation maintenance system, and so they built an organization that trains people in the community to do the day-to-day maintenance and repair of the vehicles. They have also developed a very simple, effective procurement process to buy the parts that are needed. It is so simple.

When you ask Barry Coleman about it, he says, “We change the oil filters, and we teach people.” But what he’s doing in rural Africa is actually quite profound because about 60 percent of the people in the rural areas have precarious living conditions, and transportation is really important.

Be Inkandescent: Can you give us another example of highly effective social entrepreneur?

Pamela Hartigan: That would be Marc Koska, who came up with what we call “the self-destructible syringe.” The idea came to him after reading a newspaper article in 1984 predicting the transmission of HIV through the reuse of needles and syringes. He vowed to do something about it, and he studied how drug addicts used syringes in the UK, went to Geneva to learn about Public Health Policy, visited several syringe factories, studied plastic injection molding, and read everything available on the transmission of viruses like HIV.

After a year of studying the problem, he concluded that syringe manufacture was the key to the problem. Koska designed a syringe, called the K1, which could be made on existing equipment with a small modification. It was made from the same materials and could be used in the same way as a normal syringe so that health-care professionals would not have to retrain. K1 syringes cannot be used again, ensuring that the next patient will also have a sterile and safe injection. He also realized he needed to teach the public about the dangers of reusing needles. In 2005, he founded The SafePoint Trust, a registered charity dedicated to educating children about this issue.

The best news is that now the World Health Organization is stepping in and ensuring that all syringe manufactures make self-destructing syringes.

Be Inkandescent: It is incredibly hard to get a product to this point, isn’t it?

Pamela Hartigan: It is—but then, life is not easy as an entrepreneur. They change the rules of the game, because they see something that none of the rest of us sees. They are visionaries who put out the idea and inspire people. But they can’t do it alone. If they don’t have a team behind them—others who can operationalize their vision—their ideas will go nowhere. I think we over-emphasis the superhero ideal of the entrepreneur, and under-emphasize the team.

Consider Bo Peabody’s research. In his wonderful book, Lucky or Smart: Secrets to an Entrepreneurial Life, he talks about how he was a B-student and how that’s what made him a great entrepreneur. He explains that he doesn’t just function in terms of really going deep on one particular aspect, the way A-students tend to do. He just knows a little bit of everything, and has what he considers good “peripheral vision.” I recognize that in myself. We all have our strengths and weaknesses, so on my team I place people who are super detail-oriented, because that’s not my strength.

Be Inkandescent: In your book, you name the 10 Characteristics of Successful Social Entrepreneurs. Can you share those with us?

Pamela Hartigan: Of course. Keep in mind that capturing the common characteristics of such extraordinary, diverse people is tough. But there are some especially noteworthy qualities that they all seem to possess.

Among other things, social entrepreneurs:

1. Try to shrug off the constraints of ideology or discipline.

2. Identify and apply practical solutions to social problems, combining innovation, resourcefulness, and opportunity.

3. Innovate by finding a new product, service, or approach to a social problem.

4. Focus—first and foremost—on social value creation and, in that spirit, are willing to share their innovations and insights for others to replicate.

5. Jump in before ensuring they are fully resourced.

6. Have an unwavering belief in everyone’s innate capacity, often regardless of education, to contribute meaningfully to economic and social development.

7. Show a dogged determination that pushes them to take risks that others wouldn’t dare.

8. Balance their passion for change with a zeal to measure and monitor their impact.

9. Have a great deal to teach change-makers in other sectors.

10. Display a healthy impatience, and do not do well in bureaucracies, which can raise succession issues as their organizations grow and almost inevitably become more bureaucratic.

Be Inkandescent: We can’t thank you enough for your time, and look forward to staying in touch with the work you are doing at the Skoll Centre.

Pamela Hartigan: It was my pleasure. Please continue to check out our website for details about social entrepreneurship, www.sbs.ox.ac.uk.

Save the date for the 2013 Skoll World Forum on Social Entrepreneurship. It’s our 10th anniversary, and since 2004, the Skoll Foundation and its partners at the Skoll Centre at Oxford University have convened this invitational event, which hosts more than 800 delegates from more than 65 countries for three remarkable days of sharing, learning, and inspiration.

Delegates represent the best and brightest thinkers and practitioners from the social, academic, finance, private, and policy sectors. We invite you to participate in this 10th Skoll World Forum as we engage in collaborative discussion around innovating, accelerating, and scaling solutions to the world’s most pressing social issues.

Past contributors include: Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, Former US President Jimmy Carter, Former US Vice President Al Gore, and Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan. Click here for a complete list of speakers and highlights from this year’s event that was held in March 2012.

Click here to buy your copy of The Power of Unreasonable People.

Part of your destiny is to live in the zone of maximum satisfaction.”

– Martha Beck

Remember that it’s okay to ask for help when you’re stumped, because sometimes you really can’t be expected to handle everything alone.”

– Martha Beck

It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.”

– Charles Darwin

It is possible to fail in many ways…while to succeed is possible only in one way.”

– Aristotle

If it isn’t good, let it die. If it doesn’t die, make it good.”

– Ajahn Chah

We need to learn to set our course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

– General Omar Bradley

Once you find something you love to do, be the best at doing it.”

– Debbi Fields, Mrs. Fields Cookies

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.”

– William Butler Yeats

Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional.”

– Dalai Lama

Many people prefer to play it safe when it comes to business matters. Are you willing to take risks in the pursuit of entrepreneurial success?”

– Steven Schussler

Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside of a dog it’s too dark to read.”

– Groucho Marx

Just don’t give up trying to do what you really want to do.
 Where there is love and inspiration, I don’t think you can go wrong.”

– Ella Fitzgerald

Anything not worth doing well is not worth doing.”

– Warren Buffett

Do you believe it is important to give back some portion of your wealth to support charitable causes?”

– Steven Schussler

Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self-confidence.”

– Robert Frost

How do you stay resilient? It’s about momentum. Like riding a bicycle. If you stop you fall over. So I keep pedaling.”

– Diane Lane

Destiny is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved.”

– William Jennings Bryan

When you are asked if you can do a job, tell ‘em, ‘Certainly I can!’ Then get busy and find out how to do it.”

– Theodore Roosevelt

Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are. 
Let me not pass you by in quest of some rare and perfect tomorrow.”

– Mary Jean Irion

“Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently.”

– Steve Jobs, Apple, Inc.

Look at everything as though you were
seeing it either for the first or last time.
Then your time on earth will be filled with glory.”

– Betty Smith

To follow, without halt, one aim: There’s the secret of success.”

– Anna Pavlova

The journey is the reward.”

– Greg Norman

Nurture your mind with great thoughts; to believe in the heroic makes heroes.”

– Benjamin Disraeli

When I was younger I thought success was being a star, driving nice cars, having groupies. But today I think the most important thing is to live your life with integrity.

– Ellen DeGeneres

You often meet your fate on the road you take to avoid it.”

– Goldie Hawn

A diamond is a lump of coal that stuck with it.”

– Norwegian proverb

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do.”

– Mark Twain

The only way to compel men to speak good of us is to do it.”

– Voltaire

Let yourself be silently drawn by the strange pull of what you really love.”

– Jalaluddin Rumi

This is the age when magical technologies make more and more radically fun ideas plausible, even easy. You’re only limited by your creativity.”

– Martha Beck

Almost anyone can start a community, but it takes real talent and commitment to get people to show up and keep coming back.”

– Andy Sernovitz

I have spent a good part of my life convincing people that a blank sheet of paper is the greatest opportunity in the world, and not frightening at all.”

– Marty Skler, executive vp, Walt Disney Imagineering

A lot of people have ideas, but few decide to do something about them now. Not next week. But today.”

– Nolan Bushnell, founder, Atari

Sometimes the dreams that come true are the dreams you never even knew you had.”

– Alice Sebold, The Lovely Bones

Friendship is the only cement that will hold the world together.”

– Woodrow Wilson

What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?”

– Magical

With ordinary talents and extraordinary perseverance, all things are attainable.”

– Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton

There is little success where there is little laughter.”

– Andrew Carnegie

Happy are those who dream dreams and are ready to pay the price to make them come true.”

– Leon Joseph Suenens

If people like you they’ll listen to you; if they trust you, they’ll do business with you.”

– Zig Ziglar

A truly forgiving person is someone who experiences all the anger merited by injustice and still acts with fairness and compassion.”

– Martha Beck

By your stumbling the world is perfected.”

– Sri Aurobindo

Pretend that every single person you meet has a sign around his or her neck that says, ‘Make Me Feel Important.’ Not only will you succeed in sales, you will succeed in life.”

– Mary Kay Ash

I don’t do very well without fear. There needs to be a part of me saying, ‘That’s going to fail,’ so I can prove myself wrong.”

– Harry Potter's Daniel Radcliffe

Things don’t change. You change your way of looking, that’s all.”

– Carlos Castaneda

We are all faced with a series of great opportunities brilliantly disguised as impossible situations.”

– Charles R. Swindoll

Women once had the goal of being Superwoman; I think most of us now simply strive to have a super day.”

– Author, Activist Lee Woodruff

He who knows he has enough is rich.”

– Tao Te Ching

Entrepreneurs are willing to roll the dice with their money or reputation on the line in support of an idea or enterprise.”

– Victor Kiam

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