• August 2012

The Power of Unreasonable People

Playwright George Bernard Shaw once said: “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself.
Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man.”

“By this definition, some of today’s leading entrepreneurs are decidedly unreasonable—and a fair few have even been dubbed crazy,” insists Pamela Hartigan, our August Entrepreneur of the Month (pictured above).

The director of the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at Oxford University’s Saïd Business School. honored us with an interview earlier this summer when she was in NYC on her way to a conference in Brazil. Scroll down for our Q&A to learn more the new generation of entrepreneurs whose are changing the world.

Also in This Issue:

  • Rippling, by Beverly Schwartz, teaches us how social entrepreneurs are spreading innovation throughout the world. Click here for the review.
  • Ashoka founder Bill Drayton, chairman of the international social entrepreneurial organization, believes everyone can be a changemaker. Are you ready?
  • Two Truly Amazing Women inspire us this month: Tara Palacios, director of the BizLaunch program at Arlington Economic Development; and Annette Giacomazzi, whose daughter broke a bone—for the sixth time—prompting her to launch the cool California company, CastCoverZ!.

We leave you with this parting thought from the immortal Viktor Frankl, author of Man’s Search for Meaning: “Everyone has his own specific vocation or mission in life to carry out a concrete assignment which demands fulfillment. Therein he cannot be replaced, nor can his life be repeated. Thus, everyone’s task is as unique as is his specific opportunity to implement it.”

Here’s to your unique and important success. — Hope Gibbs
publisher, Be Inkandescent • president, InkandescentPR • founder, InkandescentNetworking.new! InkandescentSpeakers.com
Photo of Hartigan, above, courtesy of DumboFeather.com

Oxford's Pamela Hartigan on the Future of Social Entrepreneurship

AUGUST 2012:

OXFORD’S PAMELA HARTIGAN TEACHES US
HOW TO CHANGE THE WORLD

By Hope Gibbs
Be Inkandescent

Entrepreneurial phenom Pamela Hartigan has been the director of the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship since January 2009. She has worked with many well-known members of the social entrepreneurial community—including micro-finance guru Muhammad Yunus (pictured above with Hartigan).

Of course, Hartigan is no stranger to running high-profile organizations. In 2008, she helped launch Volans Ventures, an organization focused on building innovative scalable solutions to challenges affecting our future.

Prior to that, she spent eight years as the first managing director of the Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship, (2000-2008), a sister organization of the World Economic Forum, where she was also on the Forum Managing Board. It is focused on advancing the practice of social entrepreneurship globally, building and supporting its community of practitioners whose efforts have achieved transformational social change.

In fact, the foreword of her book, “The Power of Unreasonable People,” is by World Economic Forum chairman Klaus Schwab.

He gives us perspective on the history of social entrepreneurship, and how far the idea has come in the last four decades, explaining:

“No one did more to open our eyes to the the potential [of social entrepreneurship] than Muhammad Yunus. In the early 1970s, he began his tireless work to prove that poor women are creditworthy. How many more ‘unreasonable’ people like Yunus are out there? Hundreds, perhaps thousands.”

Knowing the potential of social entrepreneurship, supporting those who understand the concept, and promoting them, has been Hartigan’s lifelong mission.

Throughout her career, she has held varied leadership positions in multilateral health organizations and educational institutions, as well as in entrepreneurial nonprofits. A graduate of Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service in Washington, DC, she also holds masters’ degrees in Economics and Public Health and a PhD in Cognitive Psychology. Her book was co-written by John Elkington, director of the international consulting firm SustainAbility, and published by Harvard Business Review Press.

Earlier this summer, we had the privilege of interviewing Dr. Hartigan when she stopped in at Oxford’s New York City office, before heading off to Brazil to speak at conference there.

Be Inkandescent: You are a frequent lecturer on social entrepreneurship and innovation at graduate schools of business in the USA, Europe, and Asia, and an adjunct professor at the Columbia Business School. Can you explain to us exactly what is social entrepreneurism?

Pamela Hartigan: Social entrepreneurship is a new word for something that has been around since people first came together in communities. It really is about applying innovation, creativity, and resourcefulness to create new approaches, new ways of doing things, and it seeks improved ways to do things that aren’t functional or aren’t working. It its essence, it is a mindset about how you approach an opportunity.

Be Inkandescent: You have been quoted as saying that entrepreneurs are an interesting breed, for they tend to see opportunities where the rest of us see major risks, and they go after those opportunities because they understand that there is a possibility of completely creating something new.

Pamela Hartigan: Indeed. And I find it a fascinating mindset, for most of us do not have that. Most people run away from things that we think are impossible. But entrepreneurs are drawn to it like a moth to a flame.

Be Inkandescent: So you don’t believe there are many real entrepreneurs in the world?

Pamela Hartigan: No. But there are an awful lot of entrepreneurial wannabes, and that is one of the reasons we have this buzzword now—everyone wants to be an “entrepreneur.” But true social entrepreneurs are people who have a vision for combining purpose with sustainability. The important thing to recognize is that we all have the capacity to contribute to the kind of world we want to see.

This is new, because for the longest time entrepreneurs have tried to be successful in a world fragmented by an either-or choice: making money versus doing good. This has gotten us to a completely dysfunctional situation. Going forward, I believe that many of us will be part of a growing ecosystem that supports entrepreneurs—either from the financing perspective, legal perspective, or any type of other industry that the financial world has at its disposal. What’s important is that we need to be able to find financial sustainability for these big ideas.

Be Inkandescent: What are some of these new businesses that you see emerging?

Pamela Hartigan: There are so many! For example, in the area of technology, there are new tools being released that provide e-banking for the poor. And Jane Chen, who co-founded a company called Embrace, used her business and engineering savvy to come up with an innovative, low-tech baby warmer. Her product is saving millions of premature babies around the world who would not otherwise have access to incubators.

These aren’t charities, or short-term solutions to problems that will continue forever. These are solutions that are forever changing ancient systems and eradicating age-old problems.

That is what is really exciting about disruptive companies, because they are creating massive improvements—and not just because there are financial rewards waiting for them when they do. These social entrepreneurs are creating new models for survival and success in markets that no one else is looking at. It’s wonderful.

Don’t stop now! Click here to learn more from Pamela Hartigan.

How to Become a Social Entrepreneur

What does it take to become a company that is more focused on societal change than financial reward?

That is but one of the questions we asked Pamela Hartigan, the director of Oxford’s Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship, which is named for eBay billionaire Jeff Skoll—one of the world’s best known “philanthroactivists.”

Married to an Australian for 40 years, Hartigan was recently featured in an article published in Australia’s Dumbo Feather.com that describes her as talking with rage and energy.

“She also talks no bullshit,” insists reporter Patrick Pittman, adding that Hartigan has “spent a career working to disrupt and change systems from within and from without. She builds bridges.”

We had the privilege of interviewing this petite powerhouse in New York City earlier this summer, and found that Pittman’s observations were spot-on. Scroll down to see for yourself.

Be Inkandescent: You been quoted as saying that the new term “social entrepreneurialism” doesn’t exactly explain the true nature of this growing phenomenon. How would you redefine it?

Pamela Hartigan: I think of this business model as “sustainable entrepreneurship,” because it has to be socially sustainable, financially sustainable, and environmentally sustainable. For years, “social entrepreneur” has served as a useful term, but I think that people confuse it with charity—and it is not about charity. It is about really rebooting the entire system in an entrepreneurial way so that we really are responding to what we call wicked problems—intractable problems that we are having a terrible time trying to solve.

It is really interesting, but sometimes I think we live in the “age of stupid,” where solutions are so obvious. People don’t know the simple things and they want to over-complicate things. Many of the entrepreneurs I work with aren’t held back by this thinking. They find a very simple solution to a complex problem that has eluded so many for so long; and then people see what they are doing and say, “but that’s so easy.”

Be Inkandescent: In your book, you write about Andrea and Barry Coleman, founders of Riders For Health as a good example of this phenomenon.

Pamela Hartigan: Yes, they are the perfect example, because these two motorcycle fanatics went to Africa to race motorcycles, and found that all the vehicles used by the ministries and big NGOs delivering health services were nonfunctional. They realized that it was simply because no one knew how to repair these vehicles, and there were no parts available to repair them.

They saw that the solution was to create a transportation maintenance system, and so they built an organization that trains people in the community to do the day-to-day maintenance and repair of the vehicles. They have also developed a very simple, effective procurement process to buy the parts that are needed. It is so simple.

When you ask Barry Coleman about it, he says, “We change the oil filters, and we teach people.” But what he’s doing in rural Africa is actually quite profound because about 60 percent of the people in the rural areas have precarious living conditions, and transportation is really important.

Be Inkandescent: Can you give us another example of highly effective social entrepreneur?

Pamela Hartigan: That would be Marc Koska, who came up with what we call “the self-destructible syringe.” The idea came to him after reading a newspaper article in 1984 predicting the transmission of HIV through the reuse of needles and syringes. He vowed to do something about it, and he studied how drug addicts used syringes in the UK, went to Geneva to learn about Public Health Policy, visited several syringe factories, studied plastic injection molding, and read everything available on the transmission of viruses like HIV.

After a year of studying the problem, he concluded that syringe manufacture was the key to the problem. Koska designed a syringe, called the K1, which could be made on existing equipment with a small modification. It was made from the same materials and could be used in the same way as a normal syringe so that health-care professionals would not have to retrain. K1 syringes cannot be used again, ensuring that the next patient will also have a sterile and safe injection. He also realized he needed to teach the public about the dangers of reusing needles. In 2005, he founded The SafePoint Trust, a registered charity dedicated to educating children about this issue.

The best news is that now the World Health Organization is stepping in and ensuring that all syringe manufactures make self-destructing syringes.

Be Inkandescent: It is incredibly hard to get a product to this point, isn’t it?

Pamela Hartigan: It is—but then, life is not easy as an entrepreneur. They change the rules of the game, because they see something that none of the rest of us sees. They are visionaries who put out the idea and inspire people. But they can’t do it alone. If they don’t have a team behind them—others who can operationalize their vision—their ideas will go nowhere. I think we over-emphasis the superhero ideal of the entrepreneur, and under-emphasize the team.

Consider Bo Peabody’s research. In his wonderful book, Lucky or Smart: Secrets to an Entrepreneurial Life, he talks about how he was a B-student and how that’s what made him a great entrepreneur. He explains that he doesn’t just function in terms of really going deep on one particular aspect, the way A-students tend to do. He just knows a little bit of everything, and has what he considers good “peripheral vision.” I recognize that in myself. We all have our strengths and weaknesses, so on my team I place people who are super detail-oriented, because that’s not my strength.

Be Inkandescent: In your book, you name the 10 Characteristics of Successful Social Entrepreneurs. Can you share those with us?

Pamela Hartigan: Of course. Keep in mind that capturing the common characteristics of such extraordinary, diverse people is tough. But there are some especially noteworthy qualities that they all seem to possess.

Among other things, social entrepreneurs:

1. Try to shrug off the constraints of ideology or discipline.

2. Identify and apply practical solutions to social problems, combining innovation, resourcefulness, and opportunity.

3. Innovate by finding a new product, service, or approach to a social problem.

4. Focus—first and foremost—on social value creation and, in that spirit, are willing to share their innovations and insights for others to replicate.

5. Jump in before ensuring they are fully resourced.

6. Have an unwavering belief in everyone’s innate capacity, often regardless of education, to contribute meaningfully to economic and social development.

7. Show a dogged determination that pushes them to take risks that others wouldn’t dare.

8. Balance their passion for change with a zeal to measure and monitor their impact.

9. Have a great deal to teach change-makers in other sectors.

10. Display a healthy impatience, and do not do well in bureaucracies, which can raise succession issues as their organizations grow and almost inevitably become more bureaucratic.

Be Inkandescent: We can’t thank you enough for your time, and look forward to staying in touch with the work you are doing at the Skoll Centre.

Pamela Hartigan: It was my pleasure. Please continue to check out our website for details about social entrepreneurship, www.sbs.ox.ac.uk.

Save the date for the 2013 Skoll World Forum on Social Entrepreneurship. It’s our 10th anniversary, and since 2004, the Skoll Foundation and its partners at the Skoll Centre at Oxford University have convened this invitational event, which hosts more than 800 delegates from more than 65 countries for three remarkable days of sharing, learning, and inspiration.

Delegates represent the best and brightest thinkers and practitioners from the social, academic, finance, private, and policy sectors. We invite you to participate in this 10th Skoll World Forum as we engage in collaborative discussion around innovating, accelerating, and scaling solutions to the world’s most pressing social issues.

Past contributors include: Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, Former US President Jimmy Carter, Former US Vice President Al Gore, and Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan. Click here for a complete list of speakers and highlights from this year’s event that was held in March 2012.

Click here to buy your copy of The Power of Unreasonable People.

But all the while I was alone, the past was close behind, I seen a lot of women, but she never escaped my mind, and I just grew, tangled up in blue.”

– Bob Dylan

That which grows fast withers as rapidly; that which grows slowly endures.”

– J.G. Holland, novelist

I’m not afraid of storms,
for I’m learning to sail my ship.”

– Louisa May Alcott

Think of yourself as on the threshold of unparalleled success. A whole, clear, glorious life lies before you. Achieve! Achieve!”

– Andrew Carnegie

If you would create something,
 you must be something.”

– Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

This is the age when magical technologies make more and more radically fun ideas plausible, even easy. You’re only limited by your creativity.”

– Martha Beck

Traveling is one way of lengthening life, at least in appearance.”

– Benjamin Franklin

The good ideas are all hammered out in agony by individuals, not spewed out by groups.”

– Charles Brower, Advertising Hall of Fame

Try not to become a man of success but rather to become a man of value.”

– Albert Einstein

If you were independently wealthy and never had to work a day in your life, would you still choose to spend your time attempting to become a successful entrepreneur?”

– Steven Schussler

When a dog runs at you, whistle for him.”

– Henry David Thoreau

With ordinary talents and extraordinary perseverance, all things are attainable.”

– Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton

Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional.”

– Dalai Lama

Inspiration and genius — one and the same.”

– Victor Hugo

Why am I whispering when I have something to say?”

– Eve Ensler

Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.”

– Thomas Edison

To be what we are, and to become what we are capable of becoming, is the only end of life.”

– Robert Louis Stevenson

Entrepreneurs are willing to roll the dice with their money or reputation on the line in support of an idea or enterprise.”

– Victor Kiam

Education is an admirable thing to have, but it is well to remember that nothing worth knowing can be taught.”

– Oscar Wilde

An entrepreneur tends to bite off a little more than he can chew hoping he’ll quickly learn how to chew it.“


– Roy Ash, co-founder of Litton Industries

The less effort, the faster and more powerful you will be.”

– Bruce Lee

You must learn to be still in the midst of activity 
and to be vibrantly alive in repose.”

– Indira Ghandi

It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves.”

– William Shakespeare

Spend the afternoon. You can’t take it with you.”

– Annie Dillard

Be bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.”

– Basil King

‎That which grows fast withers as rapidly; that which grows slowly endures.”

– J.G. Holland, novelist

The critical ingredient is getting off your butt and doing something.”

– Nolan Bushnell, founder, Chuck E. Cheese's

You don’t love someone because of their looks or their clothes or their car. You love them because they sing a song only your heart can understand.”

– L.J. Smith

Entrepreneurs willingly assume responsibility for the success or failure of a venture and are answerable for all its facets.”

– Victor Kiam

Things don’t change. You change your way of looking, that’s all.”

– Carlos Castaneda

In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity.”

– Albert Einstein

We need to learn to set our course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

– General Omar Bradley

By your stumbling the world is perfected.”

– Sri Aurobindo

You’ve got to be willing to crash and burn. If you’re afraid of failing, you won’t get very far.”

– Steve Jobs

If you do not tell the truth about yourself
, you cannot tell it about other people.”

– Virginia Woolf

What is the point of having free will if one cannot occasionally spit in the eye of destiny?”

– Jim Butcher, White Night

My job is my hobby. I come to work to play.”

– Uli Becker, president, Reebok International

Your own words are the bricks and mortar
of the dreams you want to realize.
 The words you choose and their use establish the life you experience.”

– Sonia Croquette

As each woman realizes her power, she transforms the world.”

– Patrice Wynne, WomanSpirit Sourcebook

We need to learn to set our course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

– General Omar Bradley

The only person you are destined to become is the person you decide to be.”

– Ralph Waldo Emerson

The music is all around us. All you have to do is listen.”

– August Rush

The best hobbies are the ones that take us furthest from our primary occupation.”

– Dr. Evelyn Vogel, Dexter

No longer talk at all about the kind of man a good man ought to be, but be such.”

– Marcus Aurelius Antoninus

Let yourself be silently drawn by the strange pull of what you really love.”

– Jalaluddin Rumi

Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow know what you truly want to become.”

– Steve Jobs

Change is a math formula. Change happens when the cost of the status quo is greater than the risk of change.”

– Alan Webber, author, "Rules of Thumb"

‎No one is useless in this world who lightens the burden of another.”

– Charles Dickens

We never know how high we are
 till we are called to rise;
 And then, if we are true to plan,
 Our statures touch the skies.”

– Emily Dickinson

4oz tequila + 1oz TripleSec + 2oz lime juice + 1oz simple syrup (sugar=water), 1 cup crushed ice. Shake + dance around the kitchen.

– Avenida Margarita

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