• November 2014

The Business of Counting Our Blessings

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, we dedicate this issue to

Mind-Body Expert Dr. Andrew Weil Teaches Us How to Harness "Spontaneous Happiness"

DECEMBER 2013: ARE YOU READY FOR A LIFE LIFT?

By Hope Katz Gibbs Be Inkandescent

Dr. Andrew Weil is a world-renowned leader and pioneer in the field of integrative medicine—a healing-oriented approach to health care that encompasses body, mind, and spirit. A Harvard University-trained doctor, he is the founder and director of the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona’s Health Sciences Center.

Dr. Weil is also the author of 14 books, including 8 Weeks to Optimum Health, and Healthy Aging.

We’ve been fans of the mind-body connection doctor since the 1990s, and we think you’ll be as fascinated as we are to get firsthand insights into one of his latest books, “Spontaneous Happiness.” Scroll down to read our Q&A. And click here to listen to our interview with Dr. Weil on the Inkandescent Radio Network.


Dr. Andrew Weil on the Art and Science of Creating Spontaneous Happiness

Be Inkandescent: In “Spontaneous Happiness,” you are honest about what it means to be happy—and how in America our culture is obsessed with the unrealistic notion of feeling blissful all the time. You also share that there have been moments in your life when you felt very sad, depressed even. Why is depression such a problem for so many Americans—and why, without trying alternative therapies, do the masses rush to take medication to brighten their moods?

Andrew Weil: I think most people think of happiness as something that comes when you get something that you don’t have, something from outside, whether it’s a new car or a better job. I don’t think that’s the way it works. I think what you really want to strive for is contentment, which is an inner feeling of being complete and whole and satisfied, regardless of what your external circumstances are.

First of all, moods are supposed to vary. We’re not supposed to be happy all the time. There are highs and lows, just as there are variations from everything in nature. And so the neutral point is not happiness. I think it’s a place where you feel comfort, contentment, balance, wholeness. And I think you want to cultivate that feeling more and more. And then it’s okay if you go up above that or below it. You don’t want to have huge swings and you don’t want to get stuck in the depth. But I think it’s good to accept the normal variations of mood.

Be Inkandescent: You have drawn a lot on Eastern psychology, especially Buddhist psychology, which offers many insights into the mind and what the goal should be.

Andrew Weil: Right. And I’ve also looked at Western psychology and the strategies that are available to help people. In addition, my work on integrative medicine has made me aware of lifestyle factors that affect our mental and emotional well-being. That includes how we eat, how we exercise, how we rest and sleep, a whole range of choices we make.

Be Inkandescent: The heart of the book has very practical tips. In fact, you help readers assess their emotional well-being, you offer advice on lifestyle, behavior, and dietary changes that will make you feel better. Can you give us some tips that our listeners and readers can apply today?

Andrew Weil: Sure. The strongest scientific evidence we have for physical interventions are for regular physical activity, both as a treatment and preventive for depression, and also for the use of supplemental fish oil. I recommend two to four grams a day for optimum brain health and mood health. On the mental level, I think there are a whole lot of things we can do.

One is to choose wisely what we expose ourselves to. If you constantly listen to sad music and read sad novels and watch sad programs on TV, chances are you will be sad. So you can make choices about that. And moods are contagious, so it is good to spend time in the company of people who make you feel optimistic and positive.

There is also a section on spiritual techniques, because there’s a great deal of evidence that gratitude can boost mood. Having gratitude for your blessings is so easy. You just have to remember to be grateful for things. Keeping a gratitude journal is an easy way to keep this list. Just get a little notebook, keep it by your bed, and during the day make mental notes of things you’re grateful for—it could be as simple as the rising of the sun or seeing a flower—and when you go to bed just jot these down. Doing that for one week can boost mood for up to several months.

Don’t stop now! Click here to read more of our Q&A with Dr. Andrew Weil in Tips for Entrepreneurs.

Dr. Andrew Weil's Tips for Achieving Emotional Well-Being

DECEMBER 2013: TIPS FOR ENTREPRENEURS

Be Inkandescent’s Q&A with Dr. Andrew Weil, author of, “Spontaneous Happiness”

Are you seeking happiness? “I observe that many people are,” says Dr. Andrew Weil. “They imagine it will come to them if they get a raise, a new car, a new lover, or something else they want but do not have. My own experience, repeated many times, is that the actual emotional reward of getting and having is usually much less than the one imagined.”

Which is why he penned, “Spontaneous Happiness,” he says. The book offers more than 250 pages of recommendations to help us create an internal state of well-being that is relatively impervious to life’s transient ups and downs, and independent of what you have and don’t have.

What’s amazing to Dr. Weil is that one in 10 Americans—including children—are taking antidepressant drugs. The World Health Organization predicts that by the year 2030, more people worldwide will be affected by depression than by any other health condition.

Dr. Weil, who has struggled with moderate depression himself through midlife, investigates how we got here, what we can do outside of traditional medicine to start feeling more content, and how we can sustain this contentment through life’s inevitable dark patches.

In “Spontaneous Happiness,” he explains how, scientifically, emotionally, and spiritually, humans have the innate ability to achieve positive emotions without external agencies—a process he calls spontaneous because it is a natural one that does not rely on drugs or other medicines.

Scroll down for our Q&A, and click here for Dr. Weil’s 8-Week Plan to a Lifetime of Emotional Well-Being.


Be Inkandescent: What we love most about your book is the practical advice that you offer — including some affordable herbal remedies, that fact that exposure to light is really important, and simple breathing techniques to alleviate anxiety. Can you touch a little bit about each of these?

Dr. Andrew Weil: I think it is very important to get some exposure to bright light during the day as well to sleep in complete darkness. That’s a way of regulating our sleep-wake cycles, which are essential to good well-being. The most familiar herbal remedy is St. John’s Wort, and there’s good scientific evidence that this is quite useful for mild to moderate depression. It takes a while to work, there are some cautions about it, but generally it is safe and effective. I give specifics in the book on how to use that.

By the way, two other supplements are especially useful. One is vitamin D; it’s very important to get your vitamin D levels checked and to supplement to bring them up if they are low. There’s also a remedy called SAM-e. This is not herbal but it’s a dietary supplement that works quickly. It also has a benefit of alleviating pain of osteoarthritis. For people who are stressed and have muscular pain, it’s a good choice.

The breathing technique is a favorite subject of mine. I teach all patients simple breathing exercises. This draws on yoga philosophy. But regulation of breath is a very powerful technique to affect emotions. It’s impossible to be anxious, upset, angry, if you are breathing deeply, slowly, quietly, and regularly. So that gives you a method of controlling your emotional state at the very start of feeling anxious or upset. If you make your breathing deep, slow, quiet, and regular you can shut that off.

Be Inkandescent: Let’s step back a bit. Tell us—what inspired you to write this book?

Dr. Andrew Weil: I’m very alarmed at the completely reckless use of antidepressant medication in our culture today. I think one in 10 adults now are taking antidepressants. One in four of us are on psychiatric medication of some kind, including lots of kids. We have no idea what these drugs do to developing brains.

The pharmaceutical industry has been very successful in convincing people that ordinary states of sadness are matters of unbalanced brain chemistry that need to be treated with drugs. All of that has made me very concerned, and I wanted to give people practical alternatives to taking those medications—and instructions on how to get off them if you are on them.

They have their uses. There are certainly people with severe depression would do well on antidepressant drugs. But even then I would use them for a limited period, say up to a year, and then find ways to maintain improvement in other ways.

And I think there’s an awful lot of discontent in our society, as well as a lot of unreasonable cultural expectations—and this is going to be really strong as the holidays approach—that we are supposed to be happy all the time. That’s just not what human beings are. So I think coming to terms with our moods and learning simple strategies for maintaining that emotional sea level are very important. There’s just a lot of useful information that most people don’t know.

Be Inkandescent: Tell us more about the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine. We’re huge fans of your research director, Dr. Esther Sternberg (pictured right), who was our Entrepreneur of the Month in June 2012, talking about “The Business of Healing Yourself.” She inspired us to connect with you for this issue. So tell us more about your Center.

Dr. Andrew Weil: Our major focus has been education. We train physicians, nurse practitioners, medical residents, and medical students in integrative medicine, which is this new system that incorporates alternative medicine, natural therapies, with standard medicine.

We’ve now graduated more than a thousand physicians from very intensive two-year trainings. In addition, we offer an integrated medicine clinic in Phoenix. It’s a primary care clinic that’s delivering this kind of medicine to increasing numbers of patients.

We do active research, which Dr. Sternberg is conducting and directing. And I would say we are the leading center in the world for training people in this new system, which I very firmly believe, is the future of healthcare.

Be Inkandescent: We also want to talk about your newest book, “True Food: Seasonal, Sustainable, Simple, Pure,” which also marks your foray into the restaurant business. The book features more than 125 recipes for the fresh, flavorful, healthy dishes you serve at your True Food Kitchen locations, of which there are currently seven — in Arizona, California, Colorado, and Texas. And it’s our featured article in our December 2013 Restaurant column, where we share two of your healthy, delicious recipes.

Dr. Andrew Weil: This is based on my philosophy of an anti-inflammatory diet, which figures prominently in, “Spontaneous Happiness.” There is evidence that uncontrolled inflammation of the body, which is the root of many chronic diseases, is also correlated with depression. And therefore following an anti-inflammatory diet is a very good strategy for both preventing and treating depression.

This is a way of eating based on the Mediterranean diet. I’ve added Asian influences to it. It in no way deprives you of pleasure, and I think the success of these kitchen restaurants shows that people love this kind of food, and the cookbook gives many recipes that are based on this philosophy.

Be Inkandescent: What are some of your favorite recipes?

Dr. Andrew Weil: There’s a kale salad that is one of the most popular and is a traditional Italian dish actually. There’s also a vegan curry cauliflower soup, which I invented and is terrific hot or cold. Click here to view those, and more.

Be Inkandescent: Let’s talk a little bit about the adventure of getting into the restaurant business. You said it began in 2007 when your business partner, Richard Baxter, arranged a meeting with third-generation restaurateur Sam Fox. Tell us about that.

Dr. Andrew Weil: I’m a very good home cook and I’ve developed my skills over the years. I make really good food, I’ve invented a lot of recipes, and many people over the years have said, “You ought to open a restaurant!” I was smart enough to know that I knew nothing about the restaurant business and that it was a very tough business. But eventually I had the chance to meet a very successful restaurateur, Sam Fox.

I told him that I thought nobody had tried to bring together the worlds of good nutrition and fine dining and I proposed this concept to him. But he didn’t get it. He said health food doesn’t sell. And I think he just thought I was talking about tofu and sprouts. So I invited him and his wife to my house and I cooked for them. He liked the food and his wheels began turning.

He said he was willing to give it a try but was very skeptical. He found a chef from one of his restaurants, Michael Fender, who I was able to work with pretty well. We created these menus. The first restaurant opened in Phoenix. It was wildly successful from Day One. We now have six, including locations in Colorado and California. There’s a seventh opening in Dallas next month. pretty soon we’ll have restaurants in many locations around the country.

Be Inkandescent: What else is on the horizon for you? What other books are you working on?

Dr. Andrew Weil: I’m actually doing a second cookbook now because there was a lot of demand from people for really simple, quick recipes. I constantly hear that people don’t have time to cook, that it’s intimidating, and too hard. It’s ironic that the sales of cookbooks are at an all time high and more people are watching cooking shows on TV than ever, but at the same time, fewer people than ever are cooking.

So it seems as if cooking has become an entertainment more than something you actually do. So I want to compile a book that gives recipes that can be made in 30 minutes or less and that also conform with the principles of the anti-inflammatory diet. So the new book will be, “True Food: Quick and Easy.”

Be Inkandescent: Before you go, tell us: What is the one big message you want people to take away, not from just these books, but from all of your work in general?

Dr. Andrew Weil: That lifestyle factors under your control are the major determinants of health—how you age, how you move through the world with your mood. And just by learning some of these simple principles—how to eat and how to improve your body with the proper rest and sleep, how to reduce the harmful effects of stress—if you put these things into practice you can save yourself a lot of trouble and money and visits to doctors. And you can go through life in a state of good health, physical and mental.

For more information on Dr. Weil’s book and restaurant, visit www.spontaneoushappiness.com, and www.truefoodkitchen.com.

To listen to our podcast interview with Dr. Andrew Weil, visit the Entrepreneur Radio Show on the Inkandescent Radio Network.

Acknowledging the good that you already have in your life is the foundation for all abundance.”

– Eckhart Tolle

Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are. 
Let me not pass you by in quest of some rare and perfect tomorrow.”

– Mary Jean Irion

Some things are destined to be—it just takes us a couple of tries
to get there.”

– J.R. Ward, Lover Mine

Things don’t change. You change your way of looking, that’s all.”

– Carlos Castaneda

If you would create something,
 you must be something.”

– Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

History is a relentless master. It has no present, only the past rushing into the future. To try to hold fast is to be swept aside.”

– John F. Kennedy

A truly forgiving person is someone who experiences all the anger merited by injustice and still acts with fairness and compassion.”

– Martha Beck

Traveling is one way of lengthening life, at least in appearance.”

– Benjamin Franklin

Your own words are the bricks and mortar
of the dreams you want to realize.
 The words you choose and their use establish the life you experience.”

– Sonia Croquette

Success is the necessary misfortune of life, but it is only to the very unfortunate that it comes early.”

– Anthony Trollope

The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.”

– Carl Rogers

It is to no purpose to turn away from the real nature of the affair because the honor of its elements excites repugnance.

– Carl von Clausewitz, On War

A warrior cannot complain or regret anything. His life is an endless challenge, and challenges cannot possibly be good or bad. Challenges are simply challenges.”

– Carlos Castaneda

Great minds discuss ideas. Average minds discuss events. Small minds discuss people.”

– Eleanor Roosevelt

Challenge is a dragon with a gift in its mouth. Tame the dragon and the gift is yours.”

– Noela Evans

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”

– Leonardo da Vinci

A man who strikes first admits that his ideas have given out.”

– Chinese Proverb

Confidence is the most important thing you can teach someone… if you can teach them confidence, you don’t have to teach them anything else.”

– Vin Diesel

Persist and persevere, and you will find most things that are attainable, possible.”

– Lord Chesterfield

If we all did the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astound ourselves.”

– Thomas Edison

Do you believe it is important to give back some portion of your wealth to support charitable causes?”

– Steven Schussler

Why am I whispering when I have something to say?”

– Eve Ensler

When a dog runs at you, whistle for him.”

– Henry David Thoreau

We are perfectionists. We are hungry to work all the time. We are entertained by every aspect of business and we never want to stop working.”

– Suzy Welch

My job is my hobby. I come to work to play.”

– Uli Becker, president, Reebok International

Do you have the desire to create something new; the strength of conviction to believe your creation will be successful, and the reservoir of energy necessary to thrust it into the marketplace?”

– Steven Schussler

You don’t go into a field that requires cracking people’s heads open or operating on something as delicate as the spinal cord unless you are comfortable with taking risks.”

– Dr. Ben Carson

You take your life in your own hands, and what happens?
 A terrible thing: no one to blame.”

– Erica Jong

The best hobbies are the ones that take us furthest from our primary occupation.”

– Dr. Evelyn Vogel, Dexter

Ripeness is all.”

– William Shakespeare

In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity.”

– Albert Einstein

You often meet your fate on the road you take to avoid it.”

– Goldie Hawn

No one is useless in this world who lightens the burden of another.”

– Charles Dickens

We are not meant to resolve all contradictions, but to live with them and rise above them.”

– William Blake

There are children playing in the street who could solve some of my top problems in physics, because they have modes of sensory perception that I lost long ago.”

– J. Robert Oppenheimer

To be what we are, and to become what we are capable of becoming, is the only end of life.”

– Robert Louis Stevenson

The true entrepreneur is a doer, not a dreamer.”

– Nolan Bushnell, founder, Chuck E. Cheese's

There is a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in.”

– Leonard Cohen

My goal was to tell the life side of the story. We have become a nation of voyeurs that expect sensationalism, and that offends me.”

– Kathleen Jo Ryan

Destiny is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved.”

– William Jennings Bryan

Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.”

– T.S. Eliot

Friendship is the only cement that will hold the world together.”

– Woodrow Wilson

When you are asked if you can do a job, tell ‘em, ‘Certainly I can!’ Then get busy and find out how to do it.”

– Theodore Roosevelt

The good ideas are all hammered out in agony by individuals, not spewed out by groups.”

– Charles Brower, Advertising Hall of Fame

Nurture your mind with great thoughts; to believe in the heroic makes heroes.”

– Benjamin Disraeli

‎The biggest flaw in our existing theory of capitalism lies in its misrepresentation of human nature.”

– Muhammad Yunus

4oz tequila + 1oz TripleSec + 2oz lime juice + 1oz simple syrup (sugar=water), 1 cup crushed ice. Shake + dance around the kitchen.

– Avenida Margarita

If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

– John Quincy Adams

We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned so as to have the life that is waiting for us.”

– Joseph Campbell

Let yourself be silently drawn by the strange pull of what you really love.”

– Jalaluddin Rumi

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